10 Ways To Start Eating Sustainably

Eat right! I’m sure you have heard of vegetarianism and how it helps the environment. But if you are not willing to give up your meat, should you just continue with your old ways? I say no! Here are some ways that you can eat your way to a better society and ahealthier environment. The secret is Sustainable Food.

What is Sustainable Food?

Well according to Sustain: There is no legal definition of ‘sustainable food,’ although some aspects, such as the terms organic or Fairtrade, are clearly defined.

Their working definition for good food is that it should be produced, processed, distributed and disposed of in ways that:

  • Contribute to thriving local economies and sustainable livelihoods – both in the UK and, in the case of imported products, in producer countries;
  • Protect the diversity of both plants and animals and the welfare of farmed and wild species,
  • Avoid damaging or wasting natural resources or contributing to climate change;
  • Provide social benefits, such as good quality food, safe and healthy products, and educational opportunities.

1. Purchase local, seasonal, organic, foods.

Supporting local/regional food systems helps protect our health and the health of our communities, and helps stimulate local economies. Buying local and unprocessed or less processed foods is particularly critical to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and environmentally destructive practices and supporting local people in developing countries help in breaking cycles of exploitation and poverty.

In Cebu, you can easily head to SRP Farmer’s Market. There farmers do not deal with middle man  and do not have to pay taxes thus they earn more.

If you want to know the price difference:

1 kg of Lettuce at Farmers Market = P40-60

1 kg of Lettuce at SM Supermarket = P120

2. 2.Buy food produced by environmentally friendly farms.

Sustainable agriculture can feed the world without damaging the environment or threatening human health.

3. Keep animal product consumption to a minimum.

The University of Queensland suggests at least one meat-free day per week.

4. Buy only seafoods that are caught or farmed in a sustainable manner. Deciding what seafood to order at the restaurant and what to purchase at the supermarket can shape the future of our global marine environment.

Who does not enjoy seafood? I am a fan of crustaceans and I enjoy fresh fish but the recent fishing practices have greatly affected the marine environment. From shark-finning to illegal fishing, our love for seafood is causing destruction to our oceans. So before you order, check if it is sustainable seafood.

Ocean or tuna? When you consider the pro’s and con’s , Ocean should be the primary option. It’s been 2 years since I gave up eating tuna. Why? Eight out of the nine local canneries in the Philippines scored poorly in terms of traceability, transparency, and sustainability. Just think of it a can of tuna that sells for P20-40 per can is costing the lives of sharks, sea turtles and other marine life because they end up as by catch. What about Century Tuna? Century Pacific Food, Inc. has joint ventures with Thai Union, the world’s largest canned tuna supplier with alleged human rights and environmental abuses along its supply chain. Sign the petition here to the world’s biggest tuna company.

5. Minimize food waste.

According to a recent report by UNEP and the World Resources Institute (WRI), about one-third of all food produced worldwide, worth around US$1 trillion, gets lost or wasted in food production and consumption systems. When this figure is converted to calories, this means that about 1 in 4 calories intended for consumption is never actually eaten. In a world full of hunger, volatile food prices , and social unrest, these statistics are more than just shocking: they are environmentally, morally and economically outrageous. So next time you are at a buffet, think realistically and do not let your emotions take over. Always remember what your mom tells you, finish your food and take food in moderation.

 

 

 

 

6. Not purchasing bottled water.

Buy reusable water bottles! Plastic water bottles are one of the top marine litters. Here in the Philippines, we have ATM’s or Automatic Tubig (Water) Machine that is a coin-operated water dispenser. I make it a point to always bring my water bottles and if I bought bottled water each day for a week that would already mean 7 bottles. Now add it up exponentially by the number of people in this planet!

bottled paper

 7. Eat in a way that promotes health and well-being (consuming lots of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains and avoiding artificial ingredients).

Philippine television will always have advertisements of sodas, fastfoods and other junk foods. It is no different from other countries and this constant brainwashing has made us crave for all these foods.

I rarely eat in fast food places, it is because I have seen several documentaries and I am not a fan of processed foods. As a nurse, I have always been conscious about what I eat.

If you find it hard to fully ditch some food items, here are some healthy swaps that you can do.

8. Know the cost of cheap food.

Cheap food can be misleading.

Here are some information that you do not know about cheap food:

  •  Exploitation of cheap laborers who will work long hours in inhumane conditions because they are trapped in a endless cycle of poverty.
  • Mass farming depletes the soil of nutrients and promotes erosion, so farmers have to keep expanding as they burn out their existing fields (which leads to the further destruction of natural habitats)
  • The extinction of a great variety of seeds as food scientist hone in on one genetically modified “superseed” resistant to problems like drought and insects
  • The rise of monocultures where one, dominant crop is at risk of a single threat wiping it out completely
  • Air and water pollution from the by-products of massive food processing plants, commercial farms, and factory feedlots, which makes the air we breathe and the water we drink hazardous to our health
  • Carbon emissions from the use of fossil fuels to keep all of the food system machinery moving; which leads to global warming and unpredictable climate changes (which ironically has repercussions on farming and crop yield!)
  • The use of viruses to break down the molecular structure of food to manipulate the genes (GMOs), a scientific practice we don’t have the longevity or the research to know if it’s really safe
  • Overproduction caused by commercial farming means an overabundance of cheap food, which leads to either lots of wasted, unused food or just the opposite: lots of overconsumption and a myriad of health problems including diabetes and heart disease
  • Food becomes less about nourishing people and more about profiteering; and big corporations are likely to disregard health and societal concerns in the pursuit of more and more money (their deep pockets also allow them to have very powerful lobbyists and essentially to buy out our government)
  • With every dollar spent you are telling manufacturers that it’s okay to keep doing things in the same, unsustainable ways.

9. Grow your own food.

Can you imagine how much savings you will incur if you save all the seeds? I started saving seeds from tomatoes and I have now a seedling from two avocado seeds that I saved, it was not even hardwork.

Here are other kitchen staples that we can easily regrow.

 

10. Be willing to give up convenience.

According to CDC, the average American eats away from home four times a week, and studies have shown that can translate to putting on 8 extra pounds a year. The more you eat away from home, the more the pounds can add up. Making small changes when we’re eating out or on-the-go can make a big difference in our health – and our waistlines.

In addition to that, fast food is not as convenient as we think, sure it saves you all the hassle when on a rush but it incurs later with long-term health effects.

THE WRAP-UP

When you weight the pros and cons of sustainable eating, you will realize why it is logically sound to shift. These 10 steps are lifestyle changes that you can slowly adapt to. Little by little as you progress, the changes you make will help lessen the impact we have in our environment and society because of our lifestyle choices.

With any decision, always choose the sustainable option.

“…the care of the earth is our most ancient and most worthy and, after all, our most pleasing responsibility. To cherish what remains of it, and to foster its renewal, is our only legitimate hope.”
― Wendell Berry, The Art of the Commonplace: The Agrarian Essays